Wellness Embodied Blog

We have all heard of ‘core stability’. Perhaps a term that is now overused and brings up images of planks and balancing on exercise balls. The stability of the ‘core’ is very important, however what is less targeted but just as important is stability at our joints. The body always has a want and need for stability at its joints, proximally (hips and shoulders) more than distally (knees and elbows) because if you don’t have control at the hips and shoulders, you are fighting a losing battle trying to stabilise the distal joints. Muscular control is a crucial component of

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We recently had Alex in for a Total Care Embodied assessment, as she decided she wanted to run her local 10km, but didn’t really know where to start… but we did! From the ground up! We assessed her: Feet (TICK) Calves – left calf was tight, preventing full ankle range (stretches prescribed) Knees – (R) knee had a mild valgus drift (glute strengthening) Hips – (R) glute mildly delayed firing pattern, hip lacking terminal extension (glute strengthening, hip flexor stretches) Back – TICK Neck – TICK Alex had rolled her (L) ankle 12 months prior and never really rehabilitated it,

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Most of us know the benefits of physical activity such as walking, swimming, running, cycling (cardiovascular fitness). But strength training shouldn’t be forgotten in our exercise programs, especially as we age. Not only does physical activity have a vast array of general health benefits (heart health, weight control, bone density maintenance) but is also a key factor in improving memory, reducing depression and alleviating stress. Now walking for 30 minutes a day definitely has its benefits, but is it enough to provide lasting changes, and can including strength training help increase the benefits? A recent review of research articles found

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It’s really important to have strong glut med muscles as: They form part of a complex that draws the ball of your hip joint back into the socket, lessening symptoms of arthritis, bursitis, impingement and more. They help to hold your pelvis level. This means you’ll get less shearing and jarring through your spine on movements such as walking, and less chance of landing awkwardly on your knees and ankles as you step. Key Points: Hips stay stacked over each other, or even roll slightly forwards on the top hip. Less is more- a small lift of 1-2cm where you

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Physiotherapy for patients before or after orthopaedic surgery can take place in the hospital, community, gym, pool or private practice settings (usually a combination). Research continues to show that numerous surgeries traditionally performed in Australia are unnecessary. Knee arthroscopies (key hole surgery) for arthritis have been proven to be ineffective and there is evidence that clients rotator cuff tears have the same outcome whether they undergo surgery or intensive physiotherapy. Orthopaedic surgery can take place following trauma (pinning, plating, re-setting broken bones) , where we will generally see the patient after for strengthening, stretching, balance and education on how to

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