Wellness Embodied Blog

The psoas is a key player in almost everything! A muscle that crosses three zones (lumbar spine, pelvis, hip) it is therefore crucial to stability. The primary role of the psoas is lumbar spine stabilisation and hip flexion, but very often it can become tight and weak… why? SITTING. When sitting, the psoas is in a chronically shortened position, and then when we stand, the shortened psoas alters the alignment of the spine and hips. The quadratus lumborum (QL) works overtime to try and balance the equation by trying to achieve a neutral spine. The result.. Loss of range of

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A 2017 study (Machado et al) looked into the effectiveness of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on back pain. The study found that only 1 in 6 achieved any significant reduction in pain, however those taking NSAIDs were 2.5 times more likely to suffer from gastrointestinal problems. Alternatively, lifestyle changes such as weight loss, exercise and stress reduction had positive outcomes on back pain without the nasty side effects. Oral painkillers shouldn’t be your go-to option when your back hurts, come and see one of our physiotherapists for a detailed assessment and treatment and we can get you started on a

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It seems like a drastic claim, but let’s look at some of the research. A 2012 study (Wilmot et al.) found sitting for greater than 7 hours doubled the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and even had a 13% increased risk of cancer. And a 2015 review (Biswas et al.) of recent studies also found a significant association with sedentary lifestyle and cardiovascular disease, cancer incidence and type 2 diabetes incidence. The World Health Organization blames sedentary lifestyles for approximately two million deaths each year and considers physical inactivity to be one of the 10 leading causes

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It’s really important to have strong glut med muscles as: They form part of a complex that draws the ball of your hip joint back into the socket, lessening symptoms of arthritis, bursitis, impingement and more. They help to hold your pelvis level. This means you’ll get less shearing and jarring through your spine on movements such as walking, and less chance of landing awkwardly on your knees and ankles as you step. Key Points: Hips stay stacked over each other, or even roll slightly forwards on the top hip. Less is more- a small lift of 1-2cm where you

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This week is healthy hip week, and the focus is on hip dysplasia in children – a condition which affects approximately one in 50 babies yet isn’t particularly well known. This blog post gives a quick overview of the hip joint and the issues which we see in physiotherapy practices. ​The image above shows the bony structure of the hip, which is actually a very stable joint, as the ball (‘head of femur’) sits into a deep socket (‘acetabulum’). Within the joint is a cartilaginous cushion called the labrum. Important stabilising muscles of the hip include some of the gluteals,

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